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18/05/2020 - Workers to pay for COVID-19 Crisis?

Twallet-2292428  340he Government has plans to make ordinary people pay for the Covid-19 crisis.

They are considering up to £30 billion worth of tax rises and spending cuts, according to a leaked Treasury document.

The document, dated May 5, says the outbreak could leave Britain with a deficit of at least £337 billion – and possibly £516 billion – this year, compared to the £55 billion forecast in Chancellor Rishi Sunak’s March budget. It laid out savage austerity, including pension cuts and a two-year public sector pay freeze, to “enhance credibility and boost investor confidence”.

This will mean cutting the pay and pensions of the key workers that some Tories line up to applaud every Thursday night at 8 pm. Other savage measures could also include ending guaranteed increases in state pensions.

Unions have reacted with fury to the document which suggests a two-year pay freeze for public-sector workers to help offset the cost of the coronavirus pandemic.

Matt Wrack, firefighters’ union FBU general secretary said, “Now, once again, the Tories are preparing to make the same workers pay for another crisis they did not cause.
The government is talking about dishing out medals to key workers in one breath, whilst planning pay cuts for them in another. We will fight any attempt to make those who see us through the coronavirus crisis pay for it.”

Patrick Harrington, general secretary of Solidarity said: "This leaked document shows the battles we may soon be fighting. It's no surprise to me that the government is considering making ordinary workers pay for the pandemic crisis. Of course, the money has to come from somewhere but we think the plan in this document has the wrong priorities. We advocate building our manufacturing and home market to create jobs and new taxpayers. Rather than making ordinary British workers pay for the pandemic costs we should be cracking down on rich tax avoiders."

England and Wales Police Federation chairman John Apter said: “To even consider freezing the pay of our essential public-sector workers to help the financial recovery would be morally bankrupt and would be a deep and damaging betrayal.”